Euphorbia Redwing = 'Charam'
Garden Plant Information

Euphorbia Redwing Charam

 

Euphorbia Redwing Charam winter buds

Autumn buds.

Name

Euphorbia Redwing = 'Charam' (also called Euphorbia Redwing and spurge Redwing)

Genus  

Euphorbia

Species

 

Cultivar/variety

Redwing = 'Charam'

General description

Roughly mound-forming herbaceous perennial, with blue-green leaves and bracts and flowers held in dense clusters. Good for early spring colour, especially in early morning light, when the lime green bracts appear almost neon. Suitable for mixed borders, low maintenance, gravel and Mediterranean gardens.

The flowers attract insects.

Season of interest

At its brightest in early spring, when the bracts open. During winter the plant takes on more reddish tones.

Key horticultural features

  1. Habit - upright, tending towards a dome shape. H&S: up to 75cm.

  2. Stems - rounded, fleshy and slightly brittle, red tinged. The stems exudes an irritant milky sap when broken.

  3. Leaves - no petioles, narrow, slightly succulent, green-blue. Young growth is tinged with red.

  4. Flowers/bracts - dense clusters of very bright lime-yellow cup shaped bracts, borne on red stems, hold tiny flowers which open in early spring. The buds appear in late autumn, starting green, then turning red before opening.

Cultural details

Aspect

Sun to partial shade. East, west or south facing.

Soil

Well drained, light.

Hardiness

Hardy, but in cold or frost-prone areas plant at the base of a wall.

Maintenance

Cut back old flower heads to ground level in summer or autumn to promote next year's flowers.

 

May be affected by aphids and grey mould.

 

N.B. This plant exudes an irritant milky sap, so always wear gloves when working with it.

Propagation

 

Divide in early spring or take basal cuttings in spring and summer. To prevent the cuttings bleeding sap, dip them in lukewarm water or powdered charcoal.

 

 

 

Copyright wildchicken 2004 - 2014

No content may be reproduced without permission.

www.wildchicken.com

 

Published: 04-01-2006

Updated:   04-01-2006